Covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london. Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London 2019-02-10

Covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london Rating: 5,5/10 1488 reviews

Revisiting British reggae record sleeves

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

For Steph, it feels natural to explore the overlapping boundaries between the two disciplines, creating work that utilises her technical drawing skills and design sensibilities. A few record covers were photographed close to where the recording studio was. Some were easy to find while others took months of detective work. So checked all the locks on the Thames where the river would be that wide and finally found the location at Molesey Lock close to Hampton Court. Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London is a project by photographer Alex Bartsch documenting reggae album covers shot in London between 1967 and 1988. It was around the time Trojan went under. Watch the Kickstarter video below for more details and make sure to back this amazing project now.

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Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London by Al 'Fingers' Newman

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

It's been a great adventure, and has painted an interesting map of London's reggae music heritage. To date I have located more than 40 covers. The cover features a woman standing on the corner of Atlantic Road and Electric Avenue in Brixton. Any history of reggae going global must trace a path directly from Kingston to London. I ended up traveling all around the capital—to Penge in the southeast, Molesey Lock right on the very edge of greater London, Wembley in the northwest, Haringey in north London, and Lesnes Abbey ruins in Abbey Wood. London based photographer Alex Bartsch has started a crowdfunding campaign on to get his book published. No money for a location or anything like that.

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Photographer Alex Bartsch recreates classic vinyl covers in original London locations

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

Along the way I had given up on some covers, but later, armed with newfound detective skills, I would go back to them hoping to crack the case. A Camberwell College of Arts graduate, she depicts the world as she sees it, opening up about her joys and worries through fine-line work, a mixture of media and lavish use of colour. Is there any cover that sticks out as particularly challenging to find? Originally from Canada but now based in New York City, captures the world, the things he interested in, the objects or places he loves as still images. Even these days, the local industry offers little in the way of exciting opportunities for young people. Some were easy to find while others took months of detective work. To release a limited series of Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves was a very good idea. Moodie wrote Reggae on the Moon, which is said by some to have inspired Sting to write Dancing on the Moon.

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Revisiting British reggae record sleeves

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

And despite the fact that the work hails from the other side of the world to where we are now, Klim does not hold back in the quality of its typefaces nor in its playful yet thoughtful approach to design. I then added strings and took it to Trojan for release, complete with a Ras Daniel Hartman cover. Risks and challenges We are aware there may be unexpected challenges with this project, but having produced numerous books in the past, are confident we will be able to solve any potential problems. His style was unique, and managed to perfectly embody the spirit of the music inside the sleeve — vibrant, humorous and often outrageous. It's just amazing work, I'm a big fan of jazz, reggae records, and especially artists who have made covers for them.

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It's Nice That

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

It's been a great adventure, and has painted an interesting map of London's reggae music heritage. The album was photographed on Downhills Park Road in front of what is now Haringey Council's professional development centre. Writer from Frank Melak 30 10 2018 Leave a comment. Delivering image after image with panache, she fulfils every commission not to mention her personal work with magnetism. When I got to know him I realised that he also did art, so asked him to do some album covers for me.

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Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

This is a show not be missed. Original artwork was eschewed in favour of photographs of the artist in often relatively mundane surroundings, sometimes only yards from the offices of the record company in question. That is usually where I started my research into where the photo was taken. It's just a great book that has become one of the best in my collection. Perseverance is the best tool! Back in the day, money was tight and these records had to be sleeved as cheaply as possible. To achieve some of these shots I had to hitch a boat ride across Regents Canal, climb onto a roof top near Old Street, ask to enter someone's front room in Hampstead, access a back yard in Wembley and venture on to the Westway in west London.

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The Pitch

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

To augment the photographs, Bartsch and Newman have traced and interviewed people that were involved in the album in some way, be it the original artist, photographer, designer or somebody from the record label. Lansdowne Studios was also based in the area. The book comprises Alex Bartsch's present-day photos of reggae album sleeves held up in front of the spot where they were taken so many years ago. Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves In London is available to. Hip-hop in New York would be another great one.

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Retracing reggae records in their original London location

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

To augment the photographs, Bartsch and Newman have traced and interviewed people that were involved in the album in some way, be it the original artist, photographer, designer or somebody from the record label. If you were a Londoner growing up between the 60s and 80s, then we have the thing for you: Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London. I decided to do another album and took control as producer, picking twelve songs, which I recorded at Dynamic Studios in Jamaica with the arranger Brian Rogers. Are you thinking of any other cities and styles of music? It reminded me of the work of Alex Steinweiss - is credited with singlehandedly creating the format, design and graphic 'language' of the album cover. Cookies and similar technologies are used to improve your experience, to do things like: - remember your login, general, and regional preferences - personalize content, search, recommendations, and offers Without these technologies, things like personalised recommendations, your account preferences, or localisation may not work correctly. From then on, I was hooked.

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The Pitch

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

An inventive photographer has retaken famous record covers in their original locations. It took five years to build and connects Den Oever in North Holland province to the village of Zurich in Friesland province. Saying no will not stop you from seeing our ads, but it may make them less relevant or more repetitive. Alex Bartsch can be found on Instagram posting as , and One Love Books are at. I cycled all over the city, from Penge in southeast London to Harlesden in the northwest. All the resulting snaps will be published in his book, Covers: Retracing Reggae Record Sleeves in London.

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Alex Bartsch

covers retracing reggae record sleeves in london

Holland Park is the closest park from the studio, and that's where I found the location of the cover. Original artwork was eschewed in favour of photographs of the artist in often relatively mundane surroundings, sometimes only yards from the offices of the record company in question. I did what I could, given the resources. In particular, it was influenced by the work of Bob Marley. Photographer Alex Bartsch has painstakingly researched and sought out the original locations of 42 reggae record sleeve cover shots, and rephotographed them in situ.

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